New Asia College Dormitory
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • The interest in this project lies in designing the community within the student dormitory. The project site is in Shatin on a bucolic hillside on a university campus. Making a residential community for 300 students, the program includes 150 dormitory rooms, multipurpose hall, game room, study room, among other amenities. Our design intention is to maintain the sense of intimacy and close relationship between the students - we want the project to allow for opportunities where students can meet and encounter, to learn from each other through the way the architecture is designed.

    Location: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2013 - 2023
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Architect-of-Record: Spence Robinson Limited
    Project Manager: Campus Development Office, CUHK
    Structural engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    Project cost: 253,000,000 HKD / Total floor area: 6,000 sqm
    Photo courtesy: Kevin Mak
  • We create a series of small blocks for the students that spread throughout the site - by breaking down the hostel block into small volumes, the project reacts to the human scale and the natural setting of the site.

  • The concept of the transparent multipurpose hall is a collegiate “courtyard” where it embodies a shared platform to bring the different hostel blocks together, one that follows closely to the traditions of collegiate life in the Anglo-American framework that is Harvard, Yale, Oxford and Cambridge. It is essential that it is a space that is welcoming, inviting, transparent physically and conceptually to promote openness in education, both socially and intellectually.

New Library Extension
The Polytechnic University of Hong Kong
  • Contrasting the Metabolist concrete core-and-slabs construction of the existing five-story building below, our addition is a lightweight structure made of steel and glass. The logic of a distinct material palette is emphasized in the visual lightness in structure and openness in the interior spaces. The curved terrace becomes the instigator of the interior to create an organic pastoral space that subverts the systematic and rigid internal organization of the existing building.

    Location: The Polytechnic University of Hong Kong
    Time: 2022 completion
    Purpose: Library
    Total project size: 10,000sqm
    Executive Architect: P&T Architects
    Structural Engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Executive Structural Engineer: P&T Structural Engineers
    MEP Engineer: P&T Building Services Engineers
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Cheryl Cheng, Natalie Lau, Siu Man, Angela Pang, Po Po, Jessica Suen
    Photo courtesy: Kevin Mak
  • Inspired by the Bürolandschaft and Olmsted’s Prospect Park, organic forms of shades or canopies in an open plan operate like trees in a forest, offering different zones and modes of study space. The flexible layout is engaged through a series of pavilions for specific programs.

    1870 Vaux and Olmstead Map of Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York
  • Structural Analysis by Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
  • Each pavilion, such as the floating riser or the 20-meter-long table suspended from the ceiling in perfect load equilibrium, is uniquely designed to accommodate a wide range of activities at different scales, from individual quiet spaces to group workspace for gathering or collaboration. This new interior organization strategy enables students to configure their own spaces and to have a greater sense of autonomy and ownership of this space.

    Mutsurō Sasaki Exhibition | Washington University in St Louis
  • Structural Analysis by Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
  • Bürolandschaft, John Pile, 1978
  • View of the Living Room and the Dining Room of the Hameau, Chateau de Chantilly, from the Atlas of the Comte du Nord, 1784
Hong Kong Literature Archive & Research Center
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • The Hong Kong Literature Research Center transforms the existing university library into a statement of identity for Hong Kong literature. A perfect circle in the plan, the project uses bookshelves as an idea to form a contemplative vitrine, protecting the collections and making tangible the formless legacies of literature.

    Location: The Chinese University of Hong Kong
    Time: 2022 completion
    Purpose: Archive and Research center
    Structural Engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    MEP Engineer: Kinetics Engineering
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Siu Man, Angela Pang, Po Po, Jessica Suen
    Photo Courtesy: Kevin Mak, Po Po
  • Symbolically, the waves at the top refer to the traditional “winding stream” whereby scholars and poets sit by the winding water to reflect and compose poems. Tectonically, the sinuous curves increase structural depth to the precarious circle, forming a series of hyperbolic paraboloids giving the steel mesh its ability to hold the load of the books.

On the Thresholds of Space-Making: Shinohara Kazuo and His Legacy
Exhibition Part 1: Kemper Gallery, Washington University in St. Louis / Part 2: ETH Hönggerberg
  • Part 1 at Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University in Saint Louis, 2014

    The first iteration of the show was held at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum in Spring 2014. Displaying the drawings on a series of tables that are paired with photographic images of his built works, the original pencil and ink drawings create a personal connection with the viewer similar to the way an architect would have with his or her drawings at the drawing table.  This intimate relationship between the meticulous hand drawings and the architect is the basis of this exhibition design.

    Location: Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum / Washington University of Saint Louis, U.S.A.
    Term of work: 2013 - 2014
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Exhibition Curator: Seng Kuan
    Project Manager: Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum
    Project cost: 30,000 USD
    Total floor area: 1,000 sqm
  • Part 2 at ETH Zurich Gallery, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, 2016

    ​The second iteration of the Shinohara exhibition was held at the ETH Zurich Honggerberg campus gallery.  Different from in Kemper museum where the exhibition was held in a white cube gallery designed by Fuhimiko Maki, the space at ETH features a staggered irregular plan with a conglomeration of materials and colors including a wooden ceiling with diagonal layout and a clinical finish of grey vinyl flooring. It also has a beautiful courtyard with green trees that allow for a moment of contemplation. A soft grid is created here. The systematic is broken away by the shifting, by the expanding and contracting of the grid. We are not interested to maintain in a rigid that would be essential in a white cube. The tables now respond to its environment.

    Location: ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich)
    Term of work: 2016
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Exhibition Curator: Seng Kuan
    Project cost: 50,000 CHF
    Total floor area: 2,000 sqm

  • There is a circle there on the wall. What is the circle saying? The wall is lifted off ground with wooden studs. It is not part of the original building plan. A response from our previous exhibitioner - Jan de Vylder left us a wall that he designed. It reflects the existing glass wall that staggered. We inherited it. We tell our own story here.

Shinohara Kazuo: ModernNext
Druker Design Gallery, Harvard GSD
  • This exhibition showcases Shinohara Kazuo’s rarely seen original works from mid 1950’s to 1980’s when the architect’s hands are essential to the work itself. The design concept of this exhibition is to reinterpret the architect’s two most famous work, his vacation house in Yokohama and the Centennial Hall for Tokyo Institute of Technology.

    Location: Harvard GSD
    Time: 2019
    Purpose: Research & Exhibition
    Structural engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Siu Man, Angela Pang, Po Po
    Photo Courtesy: Po Po, Siu Man
  • The two pipes respond to one another to create a fulcrum as point of focus for the gallery. We applied a series of regulating lines to reorganize the long and dispersed space of the Harvard GSD Druker gallery. The pipes create intimate cabinets within the large gallery to create a rhythmic experience for the exhibition visitors.

University Library
Lingnan University
  • The existing library spans over 150m long with little connections between the North and South wing. It also was occupied with endless rows of bookshelves that provided little spaces for student use. Our concept is to insert a thin floor within the tight existing space that would become a new datum line in the library. This new floor would become the platform for generating knowledge that weaves through the space like a ribbon to tie together a disjuncted library space.

    Location: Lingnan University, Hong Kong
    Time: 2022 completion
    Purpose: Library
    Executive Architect: Spence Robinson
    Structural Engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Executive Structural Engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    MEP Engineer: TAP Building Services Engineer
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Sum Yee Cheng, Ivan Cheng, Natalie Lau, Angela Pang, Po Po, Siu Man
    Photo Courtesy: Po Po
  • We deviced a series of tectonic innovations through close collaboration with our engineers to address the peculiar existing library conditions. This allowed us to create a new floor that is so thin and light as if it floats within the existing space. We designed a two storey book wall facing the entrance that connects to a reading room in the center of the library to define a brand new identity to the university.

University Library Spatial Reorganization & Renovation
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • The University Library of the Chinese University of Hong Kong built a new extension to its original 1970’s library and its 1980’s annex. The original design of the three buildings appeared completely independent and have little relationships with each other. PA’s approach is to integrate the three buildings together to create a cohesive whole that would make a comprehensive experience for the library users. Boundary walls are taken down between the buildings to create a free plan that provides open and bright spaces for the users.

    Location: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2011- 2013
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Library / Learning Commons
    Project Manager: Campus Development Office, CUHK
    Structural engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    Project cost: 25,000,000 HKD
    Total floor area: 10,000 sqm
  • A void has been carved out from the second floor to create a vertical connection at the heart of the three library buildings. This brings natural light from an existing skylight into what once was a deep dark space, and has greatly enhanced the spatial quality of the center of the library.  Located in this void is a grand staircase that provides a study forum for students under the comfort of open space and daylight.

  • The plan is open and free allowing different types of activities to blend into one another. As shown in the entrance, the interior is bright and flexible to allow views deep into the heart of the library creating an interactive space that enhances student activities. Existing Reference Room has been reorganized where students are embraced by books to create a traditional Reading Room that connects between the Reading Room and the central Grand Staircase is the Research Commons.

Learning Garden, University Library
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Site and program were the two generative principles in the Learning Garden’s design. The Learning Garden is located in the lower ground level of the University Library’s new extension. What would otherwise be a dark and uninviting basement is flooded with light coming down from two expansive skylights, illuminating the study space underneath and providing its users with a psychological connection to the world outside. The skylights themselves are part of the existing water pools and garden of the ground level above, giving the light shining through with weaving qualities of ripples and waves in the pool.

    Location: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2011- 2013
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Library / Learning Commons
    Project Manager: Campus Development Office, CUHK
    Structural engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    Project cost: 25,000,000 HKD
    Total floor area: 10,000 sqm
  • Elaborating on this unique feature, the design became the juxtaposition of the nature aspect of Mall above against the predisposed conditions of the underground vast interior space below. The design took into appreciation of such qualities, celebrating the luminosity and scale of the space, and turned the Learning Commons into a “garden” where students can immerse themselves in the sense of being outdoor and the sense of nature while studying in this grand open space. The next question would be how to connect the idea of the garden with the functional requirements of a Learning Commons. At the very beginning of the design process, the library team emphasized the need to provide sufficient table space for the students. This request became the basis of the Learning Path.

  • The long, sinuous table weaves together different parts of the large space, bringing students together while at the same time, through its curves, defining a series of zones. This ambiguity between public and private, openness and enclosure allows for different types of activities and configurations of use. Subtle variations in the height, width, and shape of the Learning Path provide a datum line for students to discover new ways of learning and developing ideas.

    Students discover their personal way of using the space as they find suitable which was the original intention of table design. Along the walls are full height white boards that provide students a free setting for project discussions. Natural light floods from above through the water pond into the underground area bringing in light of ripples. Under the skylights are grey mounds similar to pebbles where students can sit and lay down comfortably as they study.

How to Learn Better: A Retrospective on the Learning Garden
  • This installation revisits and reinterprets our original design of the Learning Garden at CUHK. We are reflecting upon our vision of how students would use, appropriate, and co-opt this space to suit their own needs and desires. 
     
    In the five years since the Learning Garden’s completion, this subterranean space in the heart of the CUHK campus, underneath the famous Mall, has become a secret retreat for students in the know. What was once a forgotten, unwanted dungeon has been transformed into a space full of life and light. Natural light gushes down from the ceiling, descending from the reflecting pool on the ground level above. The shadow of water rippling dances across the Learning Garden, shining on the faces of students busy at work, or at play.  

    Location: Hysan Place, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong / University Library, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2017
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Art Installation
  • The Learning Path, sometimes thin and sometimes wide, sometimes tall and sometimes short, divides and unifies different modes of study. The sinuous curvature gives scale and placeness to the vast interior space and creates a variety of study alcoves with different configurations and degrees of privacy. Everyone can find a spot that suits his or her own need. The richness and inventiveness in ways the space is used far exceeded our expectation.
     
    This installation presents a narrative with all the unexpected episodes we have seen unfolding in the Learning Garden.  We have recreated scenes in the everyday lives of students who inhabit this space. The title “How to Learn Better” is a tribute to the students and CUHK’s library team who have found better and more creative ways to inhabit and enliven the Learning Garden than what we envisioned in our design.

The Harbour School, Hong Kong
  • The Harbour School site is situated in an existing  building that has an irregular shape.  The challenge is to create coherence for the school within a site that has no clear organization. Our design strategy overlays an organizing grid system that ties together what is a disjuncted space.  The classrooms are organized to create a series of courtyards that serve as common spaces of the students. The courtyards tie together the school campus to allow a smooth flow between different school activities.

    Location: Ap Lei Chau
    Completion date: August 2015
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Junior High School
    Project Manager: Jones Lang LaSalle
    MEP Consultant: Studio 5
    Project cost: 16,000,000 HKD
    Total floor area: 2,000 sqm
  • The open design approach create flexible use of space that provide an interactive and transparent learning environment. The science & technology hub includes a multi-media interactive video wall that utilizes technology as a teaching tool, while the art hub merges  fine arts with dance and music where different disciplines of visual and performing arts can break boundaries and come together.

Dissolving the Core: A Vertical Landscape
Venice Biennale Hong Kong Pavilion
  • Emphasizing the importance of experimental explorations on new possibilities, the collaboration between the disciplines of architecture and structural design expands new possibilities for form finding and space making. It is with this premise that our tower for the 2018 Venice Biennale Hong Kong Pavilion was designed. The result is a set of plans that varies from density and thickness of columns that become a landscape of different spaces.

    Location: Venice Biennale International Architecture Exhibition | Hong Kong Pavilion
    Time: 2018
    Purpose: Research & Exhibition
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Structural engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Model Fabricator: PangArchitect
    Photo courtesy: Po Po
  • Fazlur Khan Collection, Ryerson and Burnham Archives, The Art Institute of Chicago
  • Pirelli Tower | Ponti, Nervi & Danusso | 113m tall tower with gradational concrete structure and world’s first 25m long span frame
  • Structural Analysis by Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
New Asia College Dormitory
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • The interest in this project lies in designing the community within the student dormitory. The project site is in Shatin on a bucolic hillside on a university campus. Making a residential community for 300 students, the program includes 150 dormitory rooms, multipurpose hall, game room, study room, among other amenities. Our design intention is to maintain the sense of intimacy and close relationship between the students - we want the project to allow for opportunities where students can meet and encounter, to learn from each other through the way the architecture is designed.

  • Location: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2013 - 2023
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Architect-of-Record: Spence Robinson Limited
    Project Manager: Campus Development Office, CUHK
    Structural engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    Project cost: 253,000,000 HKD / Total floor area: 6,000 sqm
    Photo courtesy: Kevin Mak
  • We create a series of small blocks for the students that spread throughout the site - by breaking down the hostel block into small volumes, the project reacts to the human scale and the natural setting of the site.

  • The concept of the transparent multipurpose hall is a collegiate “courtyard” where it embodies a shared platform to bring the different hostel blocks together, one that follows closely to the traditions of collegiate life in the Anglo-American framework that is Harvard, Yale, Oxford and Cambridge. It is essential that it is a space that is welcoming, inviting, transparent physically and conceptually to promote openness in education, both socially and intellectually.

New Library Extension
The Polytechnic University of Hong Kong
  • Contrasting the Metabolist concrete core-and-slabs construction of the existing five-story building below, our addition is a lightweight structure made of steel and glass. The logic of a distinct material palette is emphasized in the visual lightness in structure and openness in the interior spaces. The curved terrace becomes the instigator of the interior to create an organic pastoral space that subverts the systematic and rigid internal organization of the existing building.

  • Location: The Polytechnic University of Hong Kong
    Time: 2022 completion
    Purpose: Library
    Total project size: 10,000sqm
    Executive Architect: P&T Architects
    Structural Engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Executive Structural Engineer: P&T Structural Engineers
    MEP Engineer: P&T Building Services Engineers
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Cheryl Cheng, Natalie Lau, Siu Man, Angela Pang, Po Po, Jessica Suen
    Photo courtesy: Kevin Mak
  • Inspired by the Bürolandschaft and Olmsted’s Prospect Park, organic forms of shades or canopies in an open plan operate like trees in a forest, offering different zones and modes of study space. The flexible layout is engaged through a series of pavilions for specific programs.

  • 1870 Vaux and Olmstead Map of Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York
  • Structural Analysis by Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
  • Each pavilion, such as the floating riser or the 20-meter-long table suspended from the ceiling in perfect load equilibrium, is uniquely designed to accommodate a wide range of activities at different scales, from individual quiet spaces to group workspace for gathering or collaboration. This new interior organization strategy enables students to configure their own spaces and to have a greater sense of autonomy and ownership of this space.

  • Mutsurō Sasaki Exhibition | Washington University in St Louis
  • Structural Analysis by Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
  • Bürolandschaft, John Pile, 1978
  • View of the Living Room and the Dining Room of the Hameau, Chateau de Chantilly, from the Atlas of the Comte du Nord, 1784
Hong Kong Literature Archive & Research Center
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • The Hong Kong Literature Research Center transforms the existing university library into a statement of identity for Hong Kong literature. A perfect circle in the plan, the project uses bookshelves as an idea to form a contemplative vitrine, protecting the collections and making tangible the formless legacies of literature.

  • Location: The Chinese University of Hong Kong
    Time: 2022 completion
    Purpose: Archive and Research center
    Structural Engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    MEP Engineer: Kinetics Engineering
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Siu Man, Angela Pang, Po Po, Jessica Suen
    Photo Courtesy: Kevin Mak, Po Po
  • Symbolically, the waves at the top refer to the traditional “winding stream” whereby scholars and poets sit by the winding water to reflect and compose poems. Tectonically, the sinuous curves increase structural depth to the precarious circle, forming a series of hyperbolic paraboloids giving the steel mesh its ability to hold the load of the books.

On the Thresholds of Space-Making: Shinohara Kazuo and His Legacy
Exhibition Part 1: Kemper Gallery, Washington University in St. Louis / Part 2: ETH Hönggerberg
  • Part 1 at Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University in Saint Louis, 2014

    The first iteration of the show was held at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum in Spring 2014. Displaying the drawings on a series of tables that are paired with photographic images of his built works, the original pencil and ink drawings create a personal connection with the viewer similar to the way an architect would have with his or her drawings at the drawing table.  This intimate relationship between the meticulous hand drawings and the architect is the basis of this exhibition design.

  • Location: Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum / Washington University of Saint Louis, U.S.A.
    Term of work: 2013 - 2014
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Exhibition Curator: Seng Kuan
    Project Manager: Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum
    Project cost: 30,000 USD
    Total floor area: 1,000 sqm
  • Part 2 at ETH Zurich Gallery, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, 2016

    ​The second iteration of the Shinohara exhibition was held at the ETH Zurich Honggerberg campus gallery.  Different from in Kemper museum where the exhibition was held in a white cube gallery designed by Fuhimiko Maki, the space at ETH features a staggered irregular plan with a conglomeration of materials and colors including a wooden ceiling with diagonal layout and a clinical finish of grey vinyl flooring. It also has a beautiful courtyard with green trees that allow for a moment of contemplation. A soft grid is created here. The systematic is broken away by the shifting, by the expanding and contracting of the grid. We are not interested to maintain in a rigid that would be essential in a white cube. The tables now respond to its environment.

  • Location: ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich)
    Term of work: 2016
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Exhibition Curator: Seng Kuan
    Project cost: 50,000 CHF
    Total floor area: 2,000 sqm

  • There is a circle there on the wall. What is the circle saying? The wall is lifted off ground with wooden studs. It is not part of the original building plan. A response from our previous exhibitioner - Jan de Vylder left us a wall that he designed. It reflects the existing glass wall that staggered. We inherited it. We tell our own story here.

Shinohara Kazuo: ModernNext
Druker Design Gallery, Harvard GSD
  • This exhibition showcases Shinohara Kazuo’s rarely seen original works from mid 1950’s to 1980’s when the architect’s hands are essential to the work itself. The design concept of this exhibition is to reinterpret the architect’s two most famous work, his vacation house in Yokohama and the Centennial Hall for Tokyo Institute of Technology.

  • Location: Harvard GSD
    Time: 2019
    Purpose: Research & Exhibition
    Structural engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Siu Man, Angela Pang, Po Po
    Photo Courtesy: Po Po, Siu Man
  • The two pipes respond to one another to create a fulcrum as point of focus for the gallery. We applied a series of regulating lines to reorganize the long and dispersed space of the Harvard GSD Druker gallery. The pipes create intimate cabinets within the large gallery to create a rhythmic experience for the exhibition visitors.

University Library
Lingnan University
  • The existing library spans over 150m long with little connections between the North and South wing. It also was occupied with endless rows of bookshelves that provided little spaces for student use. Our concept is to insert a thin floor within the tight existing space that would become a new datum line in the library. This new floor would become the platform for generating knowledge that weaves through the space like a ribbon to tie together a disjuncted library space.

  • Location: Lingnan University, Hong Kong
    Time: 2022 completion
    Purpose: Library
    Executive Architect: Spence Robinson
    Structural Engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Executive Structural Engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    MEP Engineer: TAP Building Services Engineer
    Design Architect: PangArchitect | Sum Yee Cheng, Ivan Cheng, Natalie Lau, Angela Pang, Po Po, Siu Man
    Photo Courtesy: Po Po
  • We deviced a series of tectonic innovations through close collaboration with our engineers to address the peculiar existing library conditions. This allowed us to create a new floor that is so thin and light as if it floats within the existing space. We designed a two storey book wall facing the entrance that connects to a reading room in the center of the library to define a brand new identity to the university.

University Library Spatial Reorganization & Renovation
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • The University Library of the Chinese University of Hong Kong built a new extension to its original 1970’s library and its 1980’s annex. The original design of the three buildings appeared completely independent and have little relationships with each other. PA’s approach is to integrate the three buildings together to create a cohesive whole that would make a comprehensive experience for the library users. Boundary walls are taken down between the buildings to create a free plan that provides open and bright spaces for the users.

  • Location: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2011- 2013
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Library / Learning Commons
    Project Manager: Campus Development Office, CUHK
    Structural engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    Project cost: 25,000,000 HKD
    Total floor area: 10,000 sqm
  • A void has been carved out from the second floor to create a vertical connection at the heart of the three library buildings. This brings natural light from an existing skylight into what once was a deep dark space, and has greatly enhanced the spatial quality of the center of the library.  Located in this void is a grand staircase that provides a study forum for students under the comfort of open space and daylight.

  • The plan is open and free allowing different types of activities to blend into one another. As shown in the entrance, the interior is bright and flexible to allow views deep into the heart of the library creating an interactive space that enhances student activities. Existing Reference Room has been reorganized where students are embraced by books to create a traditional Reading Room that connects between the Reading Room and the central Grand Staircase is the Research Commons.

Learning Garden, University Library
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Site and program were the two generative principles in the Learning Garden’s design. The Learning Garden is located in the lower ground level of the University Library’s new extension. What would otherwise be a dark and uninviting basement is flooded with light coming down from two expansive skylights, illuminating the study space underneath and providing its users with a psychological connection to the world outside. The skylights themselves are part of the existing water pools and garden of the ground level above, giving the light shining through with weaving qualities of ripples and waves in the pool.

  • Location: Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2011- 2013
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Library / Learning Commons
    Project Manager: Campus Development Office, CUHK
    Structural engineer: Chung & Ng Structural Engineers
    Project cost: 25,000,000 HKD
    Total floor area: 10,000 sqm
  • Elaborating on this unique feature, the design became the juxtaposition of the nature aspect of Mall above against the predisposed conditions of the underground vast interior space below. The design took into appreciation of such qualities, celebrating the luminosity and scale of the space, and turned the Learning Commons into a “garden” where students can immerse themselves in the sense of being outdoor and the sense of nature while studying in this grand open space. The next question would be how to connect the idea of the garden with the functional requirements of a Learning Commons. At the very beginning of the design process, the library team emphasized the need to provide sufficient table space for the students. This request became the basis of the Learning Path.

  • The long, sinuous table weaves together different parts of the large space, bringing students together while at the same time, through its curves, defining a series of zones. This ambiguity between public and private, openness and enclosure allows for different types of activities and configurations of use. Subtle variations in the height, width, and shape of the Learning Path provide a datum line for students to discover new ways of learning and developing ideas.

    Students discover their personal way of using the space as they find suitable which was the original intention of table design. Along the walls are full height white boards that provide students a free setting for project discussions. Natural light floods from above through the water pond into the underground area bringing in light of ripples. Under the skylights are grey mounds similar to pebbles where students can sit and lay down comfortably as they study.

How to Learn Better: A Retrospective on the Learning Garden
  • This installation revisits and reinterprets our original design of the Learning Garden at CUHK. We are reflecting upon our vision of how students would use, appropriate, and co-opt this space to suit their own needs and desires. 
     
    In the five years since the Learning Garden’s completion, this subterranean space in the heart of the CUHK campus, underneath the famous Mall, has become a secret retreat for students in the know. What was once a forgotten, unwanted dungeon has been transformed into a space full of life and light. Natural light gushes down from the ceiling, descending from the reflecting pool on the ground level above. The shadow of water rippling dances across the Learning Garden, shining on the faces of students busy at work, or at play.  

  • Location: Hysan Place, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong / University Library, The Chinese University of Hong Kong
    Term of work: 2017
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Art Installation
  • The Learning Path, sometimes thin and sometimes wide, sometimes tall and sometimes short, divides and unifies different modes of study. The sinuous curvature gives scale and placeness to the vast interior space and creates a variety of study alcoves with different configurations and degrees of privacy. Everyone can find a spot that suits his or her own need. The richness and inventiveness in ways the space is used far exceeded our expectation.
     
    This installation presents a narrative with all the unexpected episodes we have seen unfolding in the Learning Garden.  We have recreated scenes in the everyday lives of students who inhabit this space. The title “How to Learn Better” is a tribute to the students and CUHK’s library team who have found better and more creative ways to inhabit and enliven the Learning Garden than what we envisioned in our design.

The Harbour School, Hong Kong
  • The Harbour School site is situated in an existing  building that has an irregular shape.  The challenge is to create coherence for the school within a site that has no clear organization. Our design strategy overlays an organizing grid system that ties together what is a disjuncted space.  The classrooms are organized to create a series of courtyards that serve as common spaces of the students. The courtyards tie together the school campus to allow a smooth flow between different school activities.

  • Location: Ap Lei Chau
    Completion date: August 2015
    Design Architect: Angela Pang / PangArchitect
    Principal use: Junior High School
    Project Manager: Jones Lang LaSalle
    MEP Consultant: Studio 5
    Project cost: 16,000,000 HKD
    Total floor area: 2,000 sqm
  • The open design approach create flexible use of space that provide an interactive and transparent learning environment. The science & technology hub includes a multi-media interactive video wall that utilizes technology as a teaching tool, while the art hub merges  fine arts with dance and music where different disciplines of visual and performing arts can break boundaries and come together.

Dissolving the Core: A Vertical Landscape
Venice Biennale Hong Kong Pavilion
  • Emphasizing the importance of experimental explorations on new possibilities, the collaboration between the disciplines of architecture and structural design expands new possibilities for form finding and space making. It is with this premise that our tower for the 2018 Venice Biennale Hong Kong Pavilion was designed. The result is a set of plans that varies from density and thickness of columns that become a landscape of different spaces.

  • Location: Venice Biennale International Architecture Exhibition | Hong Kong Pavilion
    Time: 2018
    Purpose: Research & Exhibition
    Design Architect: PangArchitect
    Structural engineer: Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki
    Model Fabricator: PangArchitect
    Photo courtesy: Po Po
  • Fazlur Khan Collection, Ryerson and Burnham Archives, The Art Institute of Chicago
  • Pirelli Tower | Ponti, Nervi & Danusso | 113m tall tower with gradational concrete structure and world’s first 25m long span frame
  • Structural Analysis by Hiraiwa Yoshiyuki